Dec 23

What’s hotter than watching a cute princess kiss a fat, middle-aged plumber? Well, anything really, but given the headline above, the answer should be obvious: watching a cute princess kiss another cute princess. It’s sexy, it’s vaguely taboo and it’s pleasantly devoid of bristling mustaches and lingering sewage odors.

It’s much more common to see girl-on-girl kisses in other media, but it happens in games more often than you’d think. To prove it to you, we’ve collected the very best ones and ranked them in ascending order of hotness. Still don’t believe us after reading the article? Then hit play below and load up “Top 7 Girls kissing girls” to see them all in motion. (Warning: definitely not safe for work, and full of spoilers to boot.)

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written by admin

Sep 19

HughPickens.com writes: Michael Agger has an interesting article in the New Yorker about parenting in the internet era and why Minecraft is the one game parents want their kids to play. He says, “Screens are no longer simply bicycles for the mind; they are bicycles that children can ride anywhere, into the virtual schoolyard where they might encounter disturbing news photos, bullies, creeps, and worse. Setting a child free on the Internet is a failure to cordon off the world and its dangers. It’s nuts. … The comfort of games is that they are partially walled off from the larger Internet, with their own communities and leaderboards. But what unsettles parents about Internet gaming, despite fond memories of after-school Nintendo afternoons, is its interconnectivity. Minecraft is played by both boys and girls, unusually. … At its best, the game is not unlike being in the woods with your best friends. Parents also join in.” According to Agger, the significance of Minecraft is how the game shows us that lively, pleasant virtual worlds can exist alongside our own, and that they are places where we want to spend time, where we learn and socialize. “To me what Minecraft represents is more than a hit game franchise,” says new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. “It’s this open-world platform. If you think about it, it’s the one game parents want their kids to play.” We need to meet our kids halfway in these worlds, and try to guide them like we do in the real world, concludes Agger. “Who knows how Minecraft will change under Microsoft’s ownership, but it’s a historic game that has shown many of us a middle way to navigate the eternal screens debate.”

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: , ,

Sep 17

New submitter ildon writes: Recently, the rights holder of former game publisher Softdisk’s game library put the rights to some of their old titles up for sale, including Commander Keen: Keen Dreams, one of the few games in the series not to be published by Apogee. A group of fans created an Indiegogo campaign to purchase those rights. We are just now seeing the fruits of that effort with the full source code of the game being published to GitHub. About a year ago, Tom Hall found the sources to episodes 4-6, but it’s not clear what, if any, progress has been made on getting Bethesda to allow that code to be released.

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: , ,

Sep 15

An anonymous reader writes: Multiplayer modes used to be an extra part of most games — an optional addition that the developers could build (or not) as they saw fit. These days, it’s different: many games are marketed under the illusion of being single-player, when their focus has shifted to an almost mandatory multiplayer mode. (Think always-online DRM, and games as services.) It’s not that this is necessarily bad for gameplay — it’s that design patterns are shifting, and if you don’t like multiplayer, you’re going to have a harder time finding games you do like. The article’s author uses a couple recent major titles as backdrop for the discussion: “With both Diablo III and Destiny, I’m not sure where and how to attribute my enjoyment. Yes, the mechanics of both are sound, but given the resounding emptiness felt when played solo, perhaps the co-op element is compensating. I’d go so far as to argue games can be less mechanically compelling, so long as the multiplayer element is engaging. The thrill of barking orders at friends can, in a way, cover design flaws. I hem and haw on the quality of each game’s mechanics because the co-op aspect literally distracted me from engaging with them to some degree.”

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: ,

Sep 15

wiredog writes Security researcher Michael Jordon has hacked a Canon’s Pixma printer to run Doom. He did so by reverse engineering the firmware encryption and uploading via the update interface. From the BBC: “Like many modern printers, Canon’s Pixma range can be accessed via the net, so owners can check the device’s status. However, Mr Jordon, who works for Context Information Security, found Canon had done a poor job of securing this method of interrogating the device. ‘The web interface has no user name or password on it,’ he said. That meant anyone could look at the status of any device once they found it, he said. A check via the Shodan search engine suggests there are thousands of potentially vulnerable Pixma printers already discoverable online. There is no evidence that anyone is attacking printers via the route Mr Jordon found.”

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written by samzenpus \\ tags: , ,

Sep 15

jawtheshark writes The rumors were true. Mojang, the company behind Minecraft, is being sold to Microsoft. Of course, the promise is to keep all products supported as they are. From the article: “Microsoft said it has agreed to buy Mojang AB, the Swedish video game company behind the hit Minecraft game, boosting its mobile efforts and cementing control of another hit title for its Xbox console. Minecraft, which has notched about 50 million copies sold, will be purchased by Microsoft for $2.5 billion, the company said in a statement. The move marks the tech giant’s most ambitious video game purchase and the largest acquisition for Satya Nadella, its new chief executive. Minecraft is more than a great game franchise – it is an open world platform, driven by a vibrant community we care deeply about, and rich with new opportunities for that community and for Microsoft,’ Nadella said in a statement.”

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written by samzenpus \\ tags: , ,

Sep 15

An anonymous reader writes If you use Twitch don’t click on any suspicious links in the video streaming platform’s chat feature. Twitch Support’s official Twitter account issued a security warning telling users not to click the “csgoprize” link in chat. According to f-secure, the link leads to a Java program that asks for your name and email. If you provide the info it will install a file on your computer that’s able to take out any money you have in your Steam wallet, as well as sell or trade items in your inventory. “This malware, which we call Eskimo, is able to wipe your Steam wallet, armory, and inventory dry,” says F-Secure. “It even dumps your items for a discount in the Steam Community Market. Previous variants were selling items with a 12 percent discount, but a recent sample showed that they changed it to 35 percent discount. Perhaps to be able to sell the items faster.”

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written by samzenpus \\ tags: , ,

Sep 13

Destiny is a first-person shooter set in a persistent, online world. It was released on Tuesday by Bungie, the development studio behind Halo, and billed as a blending of console shooters and progression-based MMOs. Reviews for the game are finally trickling out, and most publications say it’s merely average. (Though it’s worth noting that the social and multiplayer portions of the game are difficult to evaluate in such a short timeframe, and like many MMOs, Destiny will continue to see active development.) Polygon’s Arthur Gies reports, “Destiny doesn’t look real, but rather, it looks like painted concept art, meticulously assembled and presented to you at all times. Instead, it’s the suggestion, through Destiny’s concept, its soundtrack and its visual presentation, that Destiny is big. That there’s a whole universe out there to explore, a reality worth discovering. There isn’t, though.” Jeff Gerstmann at Giant Bomb had a similar reaction: “There are cool little flashes of brilliance in Destiny, but a lot of it feels like a game designed by people who weren’t sure what sort of game they were designing. Is it a loot shooter? Sort of, but the loot isn’t very good. Is it an MMO? No, but you’ll occasionally encounter other players out in the field. A story-driven shooter like the Halo franchise? Sure, if you don’t mind digging through the developer’s website to find those little bits of lore.” The Escapist’s Jim Sterling concludes, “Destiny exists in the shadow of multiple games, taking a little from each, and doing nothing truly remarkable with any of it. It’s a prime example of how the nebulous concept of ‘content’ can be used to puff up a game without adding anything to it.”

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: ,

Sep 12

An anonymous reader writes with this piece about Digital Knights, the studio behind the Kickstarter campaign project Sienna Storm, which was cancelled this week after the team raised only 10% of their $180,000 target, despite a compelling concept (a card based espionage game) and a reputable team including the writer of the original Deus Ex, Sheldon Pacotti. The team is now seeking alternative funding before reaching out to publishers, but in an interview given this week, Knights CEO Sergei Filipov highlights what he sees as a recent and growing problem with crowdfunding games: an expectation to see a working prototype. “It seems at least 50 or 60 percent of the game needs to be completed before one launches a campaign on Kickstarter,” he says. It’s a chicken and egg cycle some indie developers will struggle to break out of, and shows just how far we’ve come since Tim Schafer’s Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter burst the doors open two years ago.

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written by timothy \\ tags: , ,

Sep 09

dotarray (1747900) writes “A surprising story has emerged today that suggests Microsoft is looking to buy Minecraft developer Mojang. The reported price tag is “more than US$2 billion.” The original report is at the WSJ (possibly behind a paywall). Quoting: “For Microsoft, “Minecraft” could reinvigorate the company’s 13-year-old Xbox videogame business by giving it a cult hit with a legion of young fans. Mojang has sold more than 50 million copies of “Minecraft” since it was initially released in 2009 and earned more than $100 million in profits last year from the game and merchandise. “Minecraft” is already available on the Xbox, as well as Sony Corp.’s PlayStation, PCs and smartphones.”

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: , ,

Sep 08

An anonymous reader writes: John Romero helped bring us Doom, Quake, and Wolfenstein, but he’s also known for Daikatana — an immensely-hyped followup that flopped hard. After remaining on the periphery of game development since then, Romero announced last month that he’s coming back to the FPS genre with a new game in development. Today, he spoke with Develop Magazine about his thoughts on the future of shooters. Many players worry that the genre is stagnant, but Romero disagrees that this has to be the case. “Shooters have so many places to go, but people just copy the same thing over and over because they’re afraid to try something new. We’ve barely scratched the surface.” He also thinks the technology underpinning games matters less than ever. Romero says high poly counts and new shaders are a distraction from what’s important: good game design. “Look at Minecraft – it’s unbelievable that it was made by one person, right? And it shows there’s plenty of room for something that will innovate and change the whole industry. If some brilliant designers take the lessons of Minecraft, take the idea of creation and playing with an environment, and try to work out what the next version of that is, and then if other people start refining that, it’ll take Minecraft to an area where it will become a real genre, the creation game genre.”

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written by Soulskill \\ tags: ,